Events

[2020-11-26] The UK abandoning 0.7% would send the wrong signal to the world 

By 2020년 11월 30일 No Comments

On November 26th 2020, Chairman Ban Ki-moon’s editorial on the UK was released on The Times. The editorial concerned UK’s decision to abandon its commitment towards the UN 0.7% and the implied message to the international community.

Chairman Ban started with the importance of next year’s cop summit” next year’s COP summit in Glasgow is so important for the world. It has the potential to be an historic inflection point in world history. A moment that future generations look back on and say marked the turning point when the countries increased their ambition and began to tackle climate change with the necessary severity” He stated.

Chairman Ban then went on about why UK is sending a wrong message through their budget cuts. “As the first G7 nation to legislate for Net-Zero, as a country that has reduced its own carbon emissions by 40% since 1990 and as one of the most generous funders and active champions of serious climate action. It has set a high standard and with it has come a significant stock of goodwill and moral authority that will help the UK when it comes to the difficult task of building coalitions for radical action to tackle this problem.” He stated with concern.

In conclusion, Chairman Ban wrote about his concerns on UK’s step.” Addressing climate change is not something that can be put off for a year or two, nor is it a luxury. All of us want to see the UK succeed in rallying the world in Glasgow next year but, as someone who shares that goal and believes in the UK’s leadership on this issue, I worry that the task will become harder if the UK takes this step.” He concluded.

If you would like to read the full article, please refer to The Times Website

 

Below is the Chairman Ban Ki-moon’s full editorial.

The costs of the Covid-19 have been felt around the world. Over 1 million deaths, and economic costs already estimated by the IMF at over $28 billion in lost global output and the disruption of children’s education across the planet. The combined effects have been catastrophic. The World Bank projects that as many as 150 million people could be pushed back into extreme poverty by next year, reversing a 20 year trend. However bad this crisis has been, the effects of climate change have the potential to be even more severe.

That is why next year’s COP summit in Glasgow is so important for the world. It has the potential to be a historic inflection point in world history. A moment that future generations look back on and say marked the turning point when the countries increased their ambition and began to tackle climate change with the necessary severity. Already, there are promising signals of this around the world, from the incoming US administration to the many countries that have announced more radical Net-Zero targets. That is the opportunity that COP26 represents for us all.

It is also the test that all of us must face up to because we will not achieve that outcome by default. That is why the UK’s leadership role as hosts of the COP, and the example it sets, is so important. It has a long-standing record as a generous nation that has helped solve problems, carry its share of the burdens of doing so and taken decisive action domestically on this issue. As the first G7 nation to legislate for Net-Zero, as a country that has reduced its own carbon emissions by 40% since 1990 and as one of the most generous funders and active champions of serious climate action. It has set a high standard and with it has come a significant stock of goodwill and moral authority that will help the UK when it comes to the difficult task of building coalitions for radical action to tackle this problem.

The UK’s decision to abandon its commitment to the UN’s 0.7% target would send the wrong message. Countries everywhere are grappling with the difficult fiscal situation imposed by Covid and the GNI target already provides flexibility to address that, falling in real times as economies contract. At a time when the world needs to increase the sum of climate finance available to tackle climate change, it would be the wrong precedent and provide a convenient excuse for other countries contemplating a similar decision.

Addressing climate change is not something that can be put off for a year or two, nor is it a luxury. The UK’s aid budget is one important instrument that it can draw on to help tackle that problem, particularly for the world’s poorest who will otherwise struggle to adapt to the costs that climate change is already imposing on them. All of us want to see the UK succeed in rallying the world in Glasgow next year but, as someone who shares that goal and believes in the UK’s leadership on this issue, I worry that the task will become harder if the UK takes this step.