Events

[2020-09-04] Ambrosetti Forum

By 2020년 9월 8일 9월 9th, 2020 No Comments
Source: Vatican News

On September 4th, an article was published on La Repubblica regarding Chairman Ban Ki-moon’s attendance at the Ambrosetti Forum. The Ambrosetti Forum is an annual international economic conference held at Villa d’Este, in Italy in order to discuss current challenges to the world’s economies and societies.

Chairman Ban Ki-Moon was invited to speak at the 2020 Ambrosetti Forum virtually, to discuss the two most pressing global challenges, which are: COVID-19 and climate change.

He spoke on the importance of constructing healthy societies, as “COVID-19 has magnified existing inequalities and widened socioeconomic divisions in our societies. It is not enough to simply go back to business as usual; we must build back better, as well as greener.” He stated.

Chairman Ban also emphasized the role of policy makers, as “investment in public health services must be made to help avoid and combat future pandemics. Protecting and bettering the health of all people everywhere should not be left solely to the health sector. Rather, this should become an all-government, all hands-on-deck strategy led by heads of state.”

In addition, he spoke about climate change, stating that “as the climate crisis continues to deepen with boiling heat waves, surging sea level rise, and apocalyptic wildfires all worsening in scope, we have no time to spare.”

He called to all individuals of various professions to work in line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) “as international cooperation, partnership, and global governance—fortified by solidarity and climate action—must light our way to a more healthy, sustainable, and resilient future for our children and grandchildren.”

To view the whole article, please visit La Repubblica’s website

Below is the full script of Chairman Ban’s speech

 

Thank you for your warm introduction.

Mr. Valerio De Molli, Ambrosetti Chief Executive Officer,

Distinguished 46th Ambrosetti Forum Participants,

 

It is my great honor to deliver these opening remarks at the 46th Ambrosetti Forum.

 

Under the theme of “Intelligence on the World, Europe, and Italy,” this renowned Forum has brought together leading policy-makers, business leaders, Nobel Laureates, academics, and other thought leaders for over four decades.

 

This guiding legacy has helped drive new policy and business approaches, disseminate key intelligence, spur innovation, and transform our world for the better.

 

I take this opportunity to show my deep appreciation to The European House – Ambrosetti and its staff for extending an invitation for me to participate today, as well as all of your hard work to ensure that the Ambrosetti Forum 2020 is an unparalleled success.

 

My sincere congratulations also go to the eminent speakers who have gathered, both physically in beautiful Lake Como and virtually all around the world, on the occasion of the opening of this important summit.

 

I am confident that the insights you will share over the next three days will go a long way towards helping define our future trajectory during a particularly unsteady time.

 

In fact, I am counting on you to help ignite new ideas and drive new actions in the policy-making and business spheres that will benefit both humanity and our planet.

 

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

We are currently living through a period of converging crises and pressing challenges that have upended the international order and ushered in a new period of global unpredictability and risk.

 

COVID-19 has significantly altered our globalized world; the climate crisis continues to deepen; great power rivalries are dangerously increasing; and technological advancement is occurring at a dizzying pace.

 

Even before the pandemic took hold of our lives, populist skepticism and anger—of globalization, institutions, facts, and even democracy itself—has fueled many of the seismic geopolitical changes we have witnessed in recent years.

 

This includes, notably, Brexit, the election of Donald Trump, and the “yellow vests” protests in France.

Now, these same dynamics are hindering our unified response to COVID-19. Refugees and migrants are made into scapegoats. Human rights are being trampled. And multilateral institutions and agreements are being undercut.

 

Instead of cooperation, solidarity, and leadership; we have seen isolationism, politicization, disinformation, a failure to listen to scientists and experts, and a resounding lack of trust in the face of the gravest threat we have collectively faced since WWII.

 

Against this backdrop, we must understand that in our increasingly interconnected world, global challenges inherently require global solutions borne out of cooperation and partnership. Today, I will highlight our two most pressing global challenges that simply can’t be solved without international cooperation, solidarity, partnership, and recommitting to multilateralism, of which the UN continues to stand as the cornerstone.

 

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

First, the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted our common global reality in unprecedented ways. We are currently living through a once-in-a-lifetime global pandemic that has contorted our daily lives, economies, health care, educational systems, and interpersonal relationships.

 

At the moment, there are over 25 million total cases and over 850,000 global deaths. The UN estimates that COVID-19 has cost 400 million jobs in quarter 2 alone.

 

And behind these staggering numbers, COVID-19 has amplified existing inequities in health care, labor, housing, food, gender equality, and other key areas.

 

This creates unique dangers for the most vulnerable, and I am deeply concerned about COVID-19’s growth in conflict areas, refugee camps, and urban slums.

 

Since COVID-19 has magnified existing inequalities and widened socioeconomic divisions in our societies, it is not enough to simply go back to business as usual; we must build back better, as well as greener.

 

I am of the view that the key to doing so and simultaneously addressing entrenched social and economic divides is by working towards health care for all and doing much more to construct healthy societies. This is crucial in both low and high-income countries.

 

In this regard, governments need to elevate political commitment and public financing to health. It is essential to holistically integrate public health preparedness, universal health coverage, and healthy societies in a three-pronged approach to build back better.

 

Policy-makers must also scale-up investment in public health services to help avoid and combat future pandemics. Protecting and bettering the health of all people everywhere should not be left solely to the health sector. Rather, this should become an all-government, all hands-on-deck strategy led by heads of state.

 

And aligning COVID-19 recoveries to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals(SDGs) is incredibly important in this connection. SDG 3, “ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages,” serves as a roadmap to do so.

 

This pandemic has underlined the great need for global leadership and a strong multilateral response. Unfortunately, we are lacking both at such a critical time.

 

Indeed, in the last six months we have witnessed a major failure in global leadership in responding to COVID-19 and minimizing its spread as nationalism has been the default configuration and great power politics have largely supplanted multilateral cooperation.

 

The US and China are engaged in a detrimental blame game instead of working together for the greater good. US leadership on the global stage is virtually non-existent under President Trump. At the same time, the divided UN Security Council has been shamefully slow to address COVID-19 and its major implications for global security.

 

To holistically respond to COVID-19 and other major global challenges such as our deepening climate crisis, we must expand multilateral cooperation, innovation, and partnership. We are all in this together, and only as strong as our weakest health system.

 

We must prepare for future pandemics as we combat this one, share information and best practices, and ultimately restore international cooperation and trust. We are still at an early stage of the pandemic and nationalist isolationism won’t help any recoveries. This virus simply does not respect borders; nor does the expanding climate crisis.

 

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

Second, climate change is fueling conflict, migration, and public health risks around the world. These dynamics will continue to worsen in the absence of strong multilateral action and renewed political will.

 

And these threats do not discriminate; all nations and their national security are, and will continue to be, endangered by them.

 

The global disruptions we have witnessed this year as a result of COVID-19 may be a preview of the chaos soon to be unleashed from cascading climate tipping points unless urgent action is taken to cut CO2 emissions.

 

And as the climate crisis continues to deepen with boiling heat waves, surging sea level rise, and apocalyptic wildfires all worsening in scope, we have no time to spare.

 

With this in mind, our pandemic recovery offers a unique and critical opportunity to forge meaningful progress to meet the aspirations agreed under the Paris Agreement.

 

Bringing the entire world together to achieve the Paris Agreement in 2015 was one of my proudest personal achievements as UN Secretary-General. It provides a collaborative blueprint to ensure the future we want. But we must all work in partnership to realize this future.

 

The time for decisive climate action is now, and the world’s biggest economies and industries need to step up to the spot in this regard.

 

Since 70% of global emissions come from just 10 countries, we need industrialized nations and business leaders to lead by example or developing nations won’t have as much as an incentive to follow through on hitting their climate benchmarks.

 

The most recent UN climate reports all paint a worrying picture of fast-approaching tipping points, unprecedented global heating, seismic biodiversity loss, and existential threats to our oceans if urgent climate action is not taken to decarbonize our economies.

 

To chart the successful future trajectory of our planet and humanity, we must ensure that the UN’s Global Goals are local business across all segments of society; in Italy, in Europe, and beyond.

 

Business and private sector leaders have a critical partnership role to play, working in tandem with governments and the UN to incorporate sustainability and climate change mitigation policies into operations. Doing so is not only critical for international efforts to achieve the Paris Agreement, it is also good for bottom lines as consumers are increasingly making choices based on climate action and corporate social responsibility.

 

Climate change is a global crisis demanding global solutions. Equity, partnership and cooperation must underpin our collective response to combat it.

 

No single country can confront climate change or achieve sustainable development on their own. We need international solutions.  In this regard, we must seize this generational opportunity to build back better from COVID-19, help catalyze climate action, and steer our planet and humanity towards a more sustainable and prosperous future. Just like the virus, climate change respects no borders. Our guiding multilateral response must transcend all frontiers.

 

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

Never before has there been a greater need to cultivate sustainable futures for humanity and our planet. The rising threats of pandemics, climate change, terrorism, xenophobia, and more give special urgency to this work.

 

COVID-19 has illuminated our interconnected nature.

 

As such, international cooperation, partnership, and global governance—fortified by solidarity and climate action—must light our way to a more healthy, sustainable, and resilient future for our children and grandchildren.

 

I am confident that this 46th Ambrosetti Forum and the insights of its distinguished participants can help synergize the concrete action needed to realize this future.

 

I thank you for your attention and efforts to this end.